Sample 107.35 Waiver Application (Swarming Drones)

Are you looking for a sample 107.35 waiver application so the remote pilot can fly more than 1 drone at a time?  (Think drone light shows or you just want multiple drones in the sky for greater situational awareness.)

Filing a 107.35 waiver can be a pain. Some people do not even know where to start. People got tired of this and Section 352 was included into the 2018 Reauthorization Act that requires the FAA to publish representative samples 107.35 waiver applications and other sample waiver applications.

But before you just copy-paste this sample 107.35 waiver application, the FAA has not really put out really good examples. The sample below does not include everything you include with your application. The sample below is really just a sample answering some specific questions the FAA wants you to answer for this specific waiver. There are questions of general applicability the FAA wants ALL waiver applications to answer. You can find that information here.

Questions applicable to all waivers would be questions on operational details, small UAS details, and pilot/personnel details. Even answering these questions might not be enough. That page even says, “NOTE: The list of questions may not be all-inclusive. You may need to provide additional information based on your specific operation.

Lastly, consider the sample 107.35 waiver application below and see if it even matches up with what you want to do. Certain types of operations have certain types of hazards. The sample 107.35 waiver application below was written for the hazards presented in the factual scenario, NOT all scenarios. If you ever need help and need to hire someone, to contact me. I have obtained many waivers successfully.

If you want more waiver application samples, go to my Part 107 waiver examples page where I list them all.


Sample 107.35 Waiver Application (Created by the FAA)

Small UAS Details

Small UAS #1 Details
Make: 123 UAS
Model: Octocopter

Small UAS #2 Details
Make: 123 UAS
Model: Octocopter

Small UAS #3 Details
Make: 123 UAS
Model: Octocopter

Small UAS #4 Details
Make: 123 UAS
Model: Octocopter

Waiver Application:

What regulation(s) do you want waived? 107.35: Operation of multiple small unmanned aircraft Start date: 20XX-11-XX End date: 20XX-11-XX

Waiver safety explanation:

ABC Drone Services is requesting a waiver to §107.35 in order to operate 4 123 UAS’s small unmanned aircraft (sUA) simultaneously for the purpose of monitoring a privately owned 40 acre, fenced in Vineyard measuring XXX feet wide and XXXX feet long, located approximately 5 miles South East of XXXX. All operations will be conducted in Class G airspace, below 400 feet AGL, during daylight hours, and with at least 3 miles visibility. A private non-public use airport is the nearest airport located 4 miles west of the propose operations area. There are no other airports within 5 miles of the proposed operations area. Our operations area consists of flat terrain with no obstructions such as trees or structures. Our proposed operation will require 4 123 UAS’s sUA fly simultaneously down the length of the vineyard, these sUAs will be lined up side by side with 50 feet separation between each sUA. Our remote pilot in command (RPIC) will be positioned halfway down the length of the field, with a visual observer (VO) at each end of the field. Our RPIC and VOs will be on a 5 foot high platforms which will enable them to see over the crops, allowing our RPIC and VOs to maintain visual line of sight with each of the sUA. Each small unmanned aircraft utilizes geo fencing to keep the sUA’s within the property boundaries of the vineyard, the sUA’s will fly a pre-programed flightpath down the length of the operational area. At the opposite end of the field the sUA’s are programmed to enter a hover until the RPIC takes manual control of each sUA individually. The RPIC will land each sUA in a pre-designated location. We have included an operations manual with our application.

Specific Operation Details:

1. Where do you plan to operate? XXXXX, XXXXXX at Latitude XX.003572 Longitude -XXX.275184 – See Section 1.5.3

2. How high will you fly your aircraft? 400 feet Above Ground Level (AGL) – See Section 1.4.4

3. Do you want to fly in controlled airspace (Class B, C, D, surface E)? No – all flights will be in Class G airspace. – See Section 1.4.8

4. Are there any other kinds of airspace within 5 miles of any planned flight area? No – all airspace within 5 miles is Class G airspace. – See Section 1.4.8

5. What kind of area(s) will you fly over? Unpopulated privately owned, fenced agricultural land – See Section 1.5.3

Small UAS Details:

1. What kind of UAS will you use to fly the operations requested in this application? 123 UAS Octocopter – See Section 1.4.9

2. What is your UAS’s power or energy source in flight? lithium polymer battery – See Section 1.4.9

3. What is your UAS’s maximum flight time (in minutes), range (in feet), and speed (in miles per hour)? Flight time with payload – 35 minutes, Range – 10032 feet, Maximum Speed – 32 mph – See Section 1.4.9

4. How big is the aircraft? a. Length – 48” b. Width – 48” c. Height – 18” – See Section 1.4.9

5. How do you ensure the aircraft only flies where it is directed (i.e. ensure containment)? “Geo Fencing” – See Section 1.4.4

6. What kind of termination system, if any, does the UAS have? Each sUA is equipped with an immediate flight termination switch – See Section 1.4.4

7. How much will the aircraft and its payload weigh when flying? 6.3lbs (aircraft) + 1.lbs (payload) = 7.4lbs (total weight) – See Section 1.4.4

8. If the aircraft carries any external or internal load (or object), how is the load secured? The payload has 2 pegs that fit into slots in the payload bay under the aircraft, and a latch that secures the payload. The only payloads that will be used are designed/manufactured by 123 UAS and are standard to the 123 UAS Octocopter system. – See Section 1.4.4

9. What, if any, external or internal load (or object) could be dropped from the aircraft when flying, and how will you assure the safety of people, or other people’s property, if it is dropped or detached when flying? a. The Sensor payload could theoretically fall off the aircraft in the event the securing latch fails. However, all tests are flown over privately owned, unpopulated, agricultural land so there is no danger of injuring a person or other people’s property.

Pilot/Personnel Details:

1. What minimum level of experience will the Remote Pilot in Command (RPIC) have to fly under this waiver?   RPIC will hold a Part 107 Remote Pilot certificated and have a minimum of 10 hours of flight time on the 123 UAS Octocopter system. RPIC will log 5 hours of operating multi-sUAs flight simulation time on the 123 UAS Mission Control Station (MCS) Simulator prior to actual multi- sUA operations

2. How many personnel (including the Remote PIC) will you use for operations under this waiver (minimum needed)?  3 – A minimum of 1 RPIC and 2 VOs will be used for all operations. – See Section 1.5.1

3. What kind of training, if any, will personnel (e.g. visual observer(s)) have prior to flying under this waiver and how will personnel be trained?

Prior to commencement of operations, each RPIC and VO will receive training on the regulation contained in Part 107, the limitations of this waiver and proper scanning techniques as described on page 17-23 of the Pilots Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge (FAA-H-8083-25B). Each RPIC and VO must complete a 20 question test on the above subject matter. This test will be signed, dated and retained on file. Prior to each operation, the RPIC will brief the visual observers on the, location, airspace restrictions, flight plans and discuss each crew members responsibilities.

How will the Responsible Person know the other personnel are competent and have operational knowledge to safely fly the UAS under the waiver conditions? Each RPIC will hold a Part 107 Remote Pilot certificate and an up-to-date flight log. Each RPIC and VO will have taken the test described above, with that test on file. If personnel will be tested, what kind of testing will be performed, and how will evaluations be conducted and documented? Each RPIC and VO will be require to take a 20 question written test, incorrect answers will be reviewed and discussed until each test can be corrected to 100%. This test will be signed and dated by the student and retained on file.

How will personnel maintain the knowledge/skill to fly under this waiver? Will recurrent training or testing be required? Prior to performing any multi-sUA operation the RPIC will have logged a minimum of 30 minutes of single-sUAS flight time in the last 60 days and 30 minutes of multi-sUAS simulation time via 123 UAS MCS Simulation in the last 60 days.

Guiding Questions

1. How does the system simultaneously control multiple participating aircraft and avoid collisions between those aircraft? 123 UAS Mission Control Station (MCS) natively supports One-to-Many control – See Section 1.4.3

2. How will the system ensure individual participating aircraft remain contained in the pre-determined operational area? a. A combination of a pre-programed flight path and Geo Fencing will be used – See Section 1.4.4

3. How will the RPIC see and avoid, or detect and avoid, all other aircraft when operation multiple aircraft? Will the proposed operations use a VO(s)? Yes, VOs will visually scan the operation area and adjacent airspace for unexpected air and ground traffic – See Section 1.5.1

4. How will the RPIC safely stop/terminate all participating aircraft in the event of a hazard? 123 UAS Mission Control Station (MCS) allows the pilot to individually select an aircraft and adjust altitude, command an immediate land, or terminate flight – See Section 1.4.4

5. How will the RPIC know when a single aircraft has failed, and how will the RPIC respond? How will the RPIC respond to multiple aircraft failing at the same time? 123 UAS Mission Control Station (MCS) has a combination of safety features to
reduce the risk of both single-aircraft error situations and multi-aircraft error situations. See Section 1.4.3

6. What additional pre-flight safety procedures would the RPIC undergo to ensure safe operation? As described above the RPIC will conduct a preflight safety briefing RPIC on the, location, airspace restrictions, flight plans and discuss each crew members responsibilities. See Section 1.4.8

7. How many command and control links and methods are used in the system? Each aircraft will have their own base-station for command and control. Do the aircraft communicate with each other? If so, what path do the communications follow? No, the aircraft do not communicate with each other. How do the system and/or individual aircraft respond when communications fail? The default behavior is for the aircraft to enter static hover until the C2 link can be reestablished – See Section 1.4.4

8. How will the RPIC maintain a stand-off distance (buffer zone) from nonparticipating people or property a. A combination of geo fencing and operating over privately owned property will be used. See Section 1.4.4 Other Certificates of Waiver or Authorization Is there a pending or approved waiver or authorization associated with this proposed operation? No

Sample 107.51(b) Waiver Application to Fly Over 400ft AGL

Are you looking for a sample 107.51(b) waiver application so you can fly a drone higher than 400ft from the ground?

Filing a 107.51(b) waiver can be a pain. Some people do not even know where to start. People got tired of this and Section 352 was included into the 2018 Reauthorization Act that requires the FAA to publish representative samples 107.51(b) waiver applications and other sample waiver applications.

But before you just copy-paste this sample 107.51(b) waiver application, the FAA has not really put out really good examples. The sample below does not include everything you include with your application. The sample below is really just a sample answering some specific questions the FAA wants you to answer for this specific waiver. There are questions of general applicability the FAA wants ALL waiver applications to answer. You can find that information here.

Questions applicable to all waivers would be questions on operational details, small UAS details, and pilot/personnel details. Even answering these questions might not be enough. That page even says, “NOTE: The list of questions may not be all-inclusive. You may need to provide additional information based on your specific operation.

Lastly, consider the sample 107.51(b) waiver application below and see if it even matches up with what you want to do. Certain types of operations have certain types of hazards. The sample 107.51(b) waiver application below was written for the hazards presented in the factual scenario, NOT all scenarios. If you ever need help and need to hire someone, to contact me. I have obtained many waivers successfully.

If you want more waiver samples, go to my Part 107 waiver examples page where I list them all.


Sample 107.51(b) Waiver Application (Created by the FAA)

Safety Justification

We request a waiver to FAR 107.51(b) for altitude of 700 feet above the ground in the vicinity of the Park for photographic documentation during reconstruction.

We will use two type of UAS aircraft.
1. ABC Drones- 30×30- inch size quadcopter 24 min battery
2. XYZ Plane- 60 inch wingspan airplane 30 min battery

I have obtained a remote pilot certificate and have logged and flown these particular UAS for 400 hours since 2016.

The city of Nowhere, USA has made a request for photographic evidence of the construction process while it is under renovation. I have a safety mitigation plan that will answer the FAA’s

Wavier Safety explanation guidelines and additional methods for safety consideration.

We have identified the risk in this operation as follows:

  • Possible collision with obstacles (trees)
  • Possible collision with aircraft
  • Loss of control due to signal loss or batter depletion
  • Overflight of persons not affiliated with the flight operation.
  • Loss of visual line of sight with the sUA by the VO and or RPIC
  • Inability of ATC notification to cease operation.

We will address these risks and present a plan to mitigate those risks using the FAA WSEG questions and then add more info that will present a clear safety plan.

WSEG question #1.

1. Describe how the small unmanned aircraft (sUA) will be able to avoid non participating aircraft and structures when operating at altitudes other than those prescribed in Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) § 107.51(b).

a. How will the Remote Pilot in Command (RPIC) and Visual Observer(s) (VO), if used, see and avoid other aircraft when flying over 400 feet above ground level (AGL)?

The RPIC (myself) will be able to avoid non-participating aircraft and structures when operating at 700 feet AGL, using a combination of several methods.

1. Geo fencing will be preset to avoid any trees, power lines and other structures in my flight area and limit the altitude to no higher than 650 AGL, allowing a 50 foot buffer for altitude and measuring errors. My lateral limit will be set to no higher than 300 feet lateral distance from the ground control station. As seen from the attached overhead view there are few obstacles to consider at this site.

2. A Visual observer will assist me with avoidance of both structures and any nonparticipating aircraft. These may include another sUA or manned aircraft, like a helicopter, balloon etc. Should an aircraft approach the flight area and it would be noticed first by the aural sound of the engine/rotor noise the RPIC would immediately lower the altitude to 50 feet agl. Upon sighting of another aircraft by the VO or RPIC action would be taken to either land or hover and wait for the area to be clear of any risk. The VO will use specific language to alert the RPIC of an encroaching aircraft or if he/she believes that the sUA is too close to a structure of obstacle. We do a pre brief (see attachment) about the communication to be used so there is no confusion during the planned flight. The landing zone would be preplanned since we have a small working area it would most likely be the same as our takeoff zone.

3. Both of the sUA’s used in this operation will have 3 multi-color strobe lights that will be used by the VO and RPIC to maintain visual line of sight (VLOS.) These lights have been rated by the manufacture to be seen for at least 3 statute miles in the daylight.

4. The RPIC will use the control station tablet to monitor the sUA’s altitude and location in proximity to the trees.  These trees will be marked on the viewable page as an area to avoid.

5. For aircraft avoidance that is an imminent threat of collision. The RPIC will maintain altitude and make an assessment as to whether it is best to maintain 700 feet or make a quick descent. In no case should the sUA be descended when the non-participating aircraft is lower than the sUA. Just making a turn to avoid collision would be a good yielding method.

WSEG Question #2.

2. Describe how the visual conspicuity of the sUA will be increased to be seen at a distance of at least 3 statute miles (mi).

a. Will the sUA be visible for at least 3 mi in the location where the RPIC will operate?

b. If yes, how will you accomplish this?

c. If no, why do other aircraft not need to be able to see your sUA from at least 3 mi?

We will make each sUA more conspicuous by placing 3 different color strobe lights on each aircraft. These strobes have been rated to be seen by at least 3 statute miles from the manufacture during the day. We also place a neon green and orange paint markings on the sUA body for better recognition by other aircraft.

Since we have limited the lateral distance of the sUA to only 300 feet from the RPIC we do not expect to lose VLOS. The expectation of other aircraft is low since there are no airports within 5 nm from the park and there are no agricultural aerial applicators that would be conducting operations nearby. The real concern is helicopters or other small unmanned aircraft. The RPIC will always yield to other aircraft so as not to create a collision hazard. The VO will assist the RPIC in locating other aircraft, and if they see one, the VO will tell the RPIC where the other aircraft is, and which way it is going. The RPIC will make a determination if the other aircraft represents a collision hazard or well clear violation, and yield the right of way as said in 107.37.

WSEG Question #3.

3. Describe how the RPIC will be able to accurately determine the sUA altitude, attitude, and direction of flight.

a. How will the RPIC know, while keeping eyes on the sUA, the current real-time (1) geographic location, (2) altitude AGL, (3) attitude (orientation, deck angle, pitch, bank), and (4) direction of flight of the sUA?

b. How will the RPIC maintain visual line of sight with the sUA (i.e., meet the requirements of 14 CFR § 107.31) at the maximum altitude and distance requested in the waiver application?

The RPIC will be able to accurately determine the sUA altitude, attitude, and direction of flight by using his natural eyesight and depth perception along with the tablet and software provided by the sUA ground control station. The real time display attached to the pilot controller will depict the actual altitude of the sUA in feet above ground level. Geo fencing will be used to be sure that the sUA will not exceed the maximum authorized altitude waived. The visual observer will be able to see the same thing as the RPIC because he has a repeater of the tablet view in his possession to verify that the RPIC does not exceed the altitude limit.

Due to the higher conspicuity that the sUA’s have and the close proximity of operation the RPIC will be able to easily determine the attitude and direction of flight.

WSEG Question #4.

4. Describe the area of operations using latitude/longitude, street address, identifiable landmarks, or other maps to include the distance from and direction to the nearest airport, (e.g., 4.8 miles SE of XYZ Airport).

The park area is located in the town of Nowhere USA at the following location: NXX XX XX W XXX XX XX. The NOTAM issued 48 hours in advance will list the location with the longitude and latitude shown as well at the XYZ 329 radial at 29.5 nm. The intended area is a .1 nm circle around the location. We will only be airborne each period of no longer than 10 minutes, to preclude battery exhaustion. Please reference the attached map which was included
with the waiver request.

WSEG Question #5.

5. Describe how the RPIC will be able to be contacted by Air Traffic Control (ATC) in case the operation needs to be terminated, as well as a procedure to notify ATC when the operation begins and ends.

Should the flight operation need to be terminated we will have a satellite phone at the site and will have the VO answer the phone in case of a termination request by ATC. The phone number is 202 123-4567. As a back up to the sat phone a cellular phone contact is 123 456-7890. We have tested the cell phone signal strength at the site and found it to be strong. Lost Link procedures and loss of control. Although we have reduced our risk of lost link by decreasing our distance from the sUA and limited our flight duration to only 10 minutes, we will have a contingency plan for lost link such that if we lose control of the sUA. The plan would a verbal warning to other in the area that we have lost control. Then the actual shutdown of the sUA using the control station. Should the sUA go to the limit of the Geo Fence and hover the RPIC will move closer to the sUA and attempt to regain control of shut down if necessary considering any hazard directly below the sUA.

Avoidance of persons plan. The plan for avoidance of people is to take any photography during the time when construction is not in progress. The park has been closed for several months in preparation for this renovation so there is typically no people using the park. Should this not be the case prior to flight, the RPIC and VO will place a yellow tape marking around intended flight area and inform people that they will need to stay outside of the barrier for safety. Should they not heed this warning we will discontinue operation until such as time as they are clear of the area.

Conclusion
We have identified the risks and addressed the issues that may pose a threat to this operation and believes that the safety of others will be mitigated in a way that the waiver may be issued.

Sample 107.51(a) Waiver Application for Operating 100+ MPH

Are you looking for a sample 107.51(a) waiver application so you can fly a drone over 100 miles per hour?

Filing a 107.51(a) waiver can be a pain. Some people do not even know where to start. People got tired of this and Section 352 was included into the 2018 Reauthorization Act that requires the FAA to publish representative samples 107.51(a) waiver applications and other sample waiver applications.

But before you just copy-paste this sample 107.51(a) waiver application, the FAA has not really put out really good examples. The sample below does not include everything you include with your application. The sample below is really just a sample answering some specific questions the FAA wants you to answer for this specific waiver. There are questions of general applicability the FAA wants ALL waiver applications to answer. You can find that information here.

Questions applicable to all waivers would be questions on operational details, small UAS details, and pilot/personnel details. Even answering these questions might not be enough. That page even says, “NOTE: The list of questions may not be all-inclusive. You may need to provide additional information based on your specific operation.

Lastly, consider the sample 107.51(a) waiver application below and see if it even matches up with what you want to do. Certain types of operations have certain types of hazards. The sample 107.51(a) waiver application below was written for the hazards presented in the factual scenario, NOT all scenarios. If you ever need help and need to hire someone, to contact me. I have obtained many waivers successfully.

If you want more waiver application samples, go to my Part 107 waiver examples page where I list them all.


Sample 107.51(a)Waiver Application (Created by the FAA)

Description of Proposed Operation:

The purpose of the proposed operations is to test the flight capabilities of our fixed wing sUA. Some of this testing will require the sUA to be operated at speeds up to 125 MPH groundspeed (109 knots). The sUA used for these operations is a fixed wing aircraft with a wingspan of 4.5 feet and fuselage length of 3 feet. The sUA is equipped with 3 strobe lights, 1 white on top of the tail, 1 red on the left wingtip and 1 green on the right wingtip. These strobe lights have been tested to be visible for 5 statute miles under daylight clear sky conditions. Further details on the sUA are contained in our attached Operations Manual.

All flight operations will be conducted over our secured private use property. The property has a perimeter of 3 miles by 3 miles is surrounded by an 8-foot high security fence. Access to the area is through one guarded secured gate. For security and safety reasons, only pre-authorized personnel are allowed on site at all times. All personnel onsite are notified of the flight operations, and will be part of the support or flight crew for the operations. If they are not required for the flight operations, they will not be permitted to enter the inside of the secured and fenced area. The operations will be conducted from an area located near the center of the secured area. The flight operations area is entirely located in Class G airspace and the nearest airport is located 12 miles to the northwest. There are 3 structures located inside the secured area near the secure gate. These 3 structures are located 400 feet inside the secure perimeter and are not in the area of operations. The nearest structures (storage sheds) outside of the secure perimeter are located 2 miles from the perimeter of the operations area. The nearest residence is located 3 miles from the perimeter of the operations area. A Google Earth image of the surrounding area is attached with the secured area boundaries in yellow and the operations area boundaries in red.

All flight crews will consist of a minimum of a remote pilot in command (RPIC) at least two visual observers (VOs) and an additional VO that monitors a ground station. The VOs (other than the VO monitoring the ground station) will be positioned to have the ability to maintain visual line of sight of the sUA and the surrounding area at all times. All flight crew personnel on-site will have access to full duplex, hands free radio communications. The sUA is capable of providing the RPIC with the position, altitude, attitude, and direction of flight of the sUA via a screen on the controller. This information is also provided to the VO monitoring the ground station via a separate screen with a minimum diagonal dimension of 8”. The sUA will operate at speeds at or below 125 MPH groundspeed (109 knots). The sUA will be operating in an area clear of any obstructions and the remote pilot and VOs will have clear VLOS on the sUA at all times. The sUA’s flight path will be limited to a maximum altitude of 200 feet AGL and be within a 1200 foot radius of the RPIC and VOs. The sUA has geo-fence capabilities that will be set to limit the operation area boundaries to be no closer than ¾ mile to perimeter fencing. The sUA will have a pre-programmed failsafe function that will automatically initiate in the event of a lost link. The function will be set so the engine shuts down and the sUA flight controls will be programed to make the sUA enter a spin. The sUA will spin into the ground to terminate the flight. The operations area is a remote area (see area of operation description), there is little risk of the sUA injuring a person or property when executing a fail-safe descent.

All flight crew members will have been trained on all aspects of the operation in accordance with our attached Training Program Manual.

Prior to conducting operations, the RPIC will verify the following:

 Communication systems are fully operational;

 sUA pre-flight check of all systems has been accomplished in accordance with our Operations Manual;

 Geo-fencing perimeters are properly set;

 All flight crew members have been briefed to include the following:

 Specific details on the route and duration of the operation;

 Review of the emergency procedures from our Operations Manual;

 Responsibilities of each VO to include:

o Designated location for each VO;

o Scanning of airspace and informing RPIC of clear airspace before takeoff and during operations.

o VO monitoring the ground station to inform RPIC and all other flight  crew of any discrepancies in flight telemetry and/or data signalstrength.

At least 24 hours prior to operations a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) will be filed. The NOTAM will include location, altitude, time, duration and nature of the activity. Further details on filing a NOTAM are included in our Operations Manual.

Sample 107.51(c) Waiver Application to Fly in Reduced Visibility

Are you looking for a sample 107.51(c) waiver application so you can fly a drone in reduced visibility?

Filing a 107.51(c) waiver can be a pain. Some people do not even know where to start. People got tired of this and Section 352 was included into the 2018 Reauthorization Act that requires the FAA to publish representative samples 107.51(c) waiver applications and other sample waiver applications.

But before you just copy-paste this sample 107.51(c) waiver application, the FAA has not really put out really good examples. The sample below does not include everything you include with your application. The sample below is really just a sample answering some specific questions the FAA wants you to answer for this specific waiver. There are questions of general applicability the FAA wants ALL waiver applications to answer. You can find that information here.

Questions applicable to all waivers would be questions on operational details, small UAS details, and pilot/personnel details. Even answering these questions might not be enough. That page even says, “NOTE: The list of questions may not be all-inclusive. You may need to provide additional information based on your specific operation.

Lastly, consider the sample 107.51(c) waiver application below and see if it even matches up with what you want to do. Certain types of operations have certain types of hazards. The sample 107.51(c) waiver application below was written for the hazards presented in the factual scenario, NOT all scenarios. If you ever need help and need to hire someone, to contact me. I have obtained many waivers successfully.

If you want more waiver samples, go to my Part 107 waiver examples page where I list them all.


Sample 107.51(c) Waiver Application (Created by the FAA)

Description of proposed operation:

Area of operation would include various locations where close proximity aerial data collection is necessary in conditions outside of 107.51(c). This location is in class G airspace, in sparsely populated area, and below 100’ AGL (unless flown within a 100’ radius of a structure, including 100’ above the structures immediate uppermost limit). This location includes, but would not be limited to current buildings and constructions projects.

We are requesting a waiver from Part 107.51(c), minimum visibility, in order to perform routine aerial data collection in conditions outside of 107.51(c).

Prior to conducting operations, the Responsible Person will ensure that the remote pilot and VO are trained in evaluating visibility using methods described in FAA Order JO 7900.5D, Ch.8. This training will be documented and made available upon request. Further details, including reference material, lesson plans, and knowledge verification are included in our Training Program Manual. The policies and procedures in our training programs mitigate the risks of operating in conditions outside of 107.51(c) because they focus on having the RPIC and VO’s accumulate operating skills, knowledge, and experience of unmanned aircraft in conditions outside of 107.51(c) prior to conducting commercial operations.

The Responsible Person will also utilize the nearest FAA weather reporting station(s) to aid in determining current weather conditions. Prior to operation, the Responsible Person will conduct a site assessment of the proposed operating area in order to identify obstructions within the operating area. A safety briefing (details located in operations manual) with all participants will take place that outlines the proposed operation, local obstructions, and methods for avoiding non-participating aircraft and people on the ground. At no time will the sUA be operated in an area where the minimum flight visibility is less than 1 statute mile as observed by the remote pilot or VO’s location.

1. All operations in conditions outside of 107.51(c) would utilize a visual observer (VO). The sUAs used in these operations will have equipage that will assist the RPIC identify the geographic location, attitude, speed, and heading of the small unmanned aircraft. The sUAs would be equipped with anti-collision lights that can be seen at a distance of 3 statute miles during daylight hours. Additionally the conspicuity of the sUA will be increased with the addition of high visibility exterior features such as reflective material and brightly colored coatings. Prior to operation, the Responsible Person will conduct a site assessment of the proposed operating area in order to identify obstructions within the operating area. A map will be prepared which denotes takeoff and landing points, the area of operations, obstacles that may be difficult to see in conditions outside of 107.51(c) and the emergency descent zones to be used in the event that operations must be immediately terminated. The sUA will be operated in close enough proximity for the PIC and VO to maintain VLOS capability. Ground-based field tests in the operational limitations proposed under this waiver request indicate that in the minimum visibility visual line of sight could be consistently maintained at 400’ from the aircraft. All operations of the sUAS will be within 200’ of the RPIC when operating in conditions outside of 107.51(c). The sUA would never be operated beyond the actual visual capabilities of the PIC and VO.

2. Not less than 24 hours prior to an operation in conditions outside of 107.51(c), a NOTAM would be filed indicating the specific operating area, operating altitude, and other notes. All operations in conditions outside of 107.51(c) would take place in class G airspace. All operations will take place at a location that will have a defined perimeter set up using cones and caution tape. Our operational safety measures include the use of preprogrammed flight plans, signage concerning the use of UAS in locations where data collection is taking place, and a comprehensive safety plan. The safety plan includes; an identified control station, from which the RPIC will conduct operations, processes to cease operations if unauthorized persons, vehicles, or aircraft enter the area of operation, and visual and auditory signals to be used during operations to communicate that unauthorized persons, vehicles, or aircraft have accessed the area. If other aircraft are seen or heard in the vicinity, the RPIC will cease operations and land the sUA yielding
right of way to other aircraft. If people or vehicles are seen or heard in the operational area, the RPIC will move the sUA a safe distance away from the people or vehicle until the area is cleared or land if area cannot be cleared. Further details of our safety plan are included in our Operations Manual.

3. Anti-collision lights that can be seen at a distance of 3 statute miles during daylight will be installed on all aircraft operating in conditions outside of 107.51(c) to make the sUA more conspicuous. Additionally, the proposed operations would be conducted in a manner where the PIC’s control station is in close proximity to the sUA collecting data. Staying in the same immediate area as the sUA in conditions outside of 107.51(c) increases avoidance capabilities of all non-participating aircraft. Our situation is a location where operating in conditions outside of 107.51(c) would be necessary. Operations would only be flown in sparsely populated areas and in airspace inaccessible to other aircraft.

Sample 107.51(d) Waiver Application (Flying Close to Clouds)

Are you looking for a sample 107.51(d) waiver application so you can fly your drone close to clouds?

Filing a 107.51(d) waiver can be a pain. Some people do not even know where to start. People got tired of this and Section 352 was included into the 2018 Reauthorization Act that requires the FAA to publish representative samples 107.51(d) waiver applications and other sample waiver applications.

But before you just copy-paste this sample 107.51(d) waiver application, the FAA has not really put out really good examples. The sample below does not include everything you include with your application. The sample below is really just a sample answering some specific questions the FAA wants you to answer for this specific waiver. There are questions of general applicability the FAA wants ALL waiver applications to answer. You can find that information here.

Questions applicable to all waivers would be questions on operational details, small UAS details, and pilot/personnel details. Even answering these questions might not be enough. That page even says, “NOTE: The list of questions may not be all-inclusive. You may need to provide additional information based on your specific operation.

Lastly, consider the sample 107.51(d) waiver application below and see if it even matches up with what you want to do. Certain types of operations have certain types of hazards. The sample 107.51(d) waiver application below was written for the hazards presented in the factual scenario, NOT all scenarios. If you ever need help and need to hire someone, to contact me. I have obtained many waivers successfully.

If you want more waiver samples, go to my Part 107 waiver examples page where I list them all.


Sample 107.51(d) Waiver Application (Created by the FAA)

Note the questions below the FAA used are from an older waiver safety explanation guideline sheet. The most current one is here.

 

I am requesting a waiver to 14 CFR 107.51(d)(1) and (2), minimum distance from clouds less than 500 feet below the cloud and less than 2,000 feet horizontally; to operate small UAS “clear of clouds” for purposes of training and R&D at a remote location as per the boundaries in red on the attached Google Earth image. The location is a remote area in Class G airspace with the nearest airport 15 miles away. The closest residence is 7 miles from the north boundary of the operations area. The only road within 5 miles of the operational area is the access road to the location.

Flights conducted under this waiver will provide data under real conditions to support future requests to operate “clear of clouds” at minimum distances from clouds of less than 500 feet below cloud and less than 2,000 feet horizontally.

All flights will be conducted in accordance with our Flight Operations Manual, a copy of which is attached.

Flights under this waiver will not exceed 100 feet agl and 500 feet from the RPIC. Details of the sUAS: Aircraft include small commercial off-the-shelf quad rotor aircraft. Each aircraft is equipped with telemetry, GPS geo-fencing, and GPS based automated waypoint functions. Specific details on the aircraft that will be used in this operation area included in our Flight Operations Manual. Typical missions will be pre-planned waypoint flights, allowing for maximum control and containment of the aircraft.

The aircraft geo-fencing capabilities allows the pilot to set maximum altitudes and flight distances, aiding in remaining within a pre-determined area. Telemetry displayed on the controller screen includes information on altitude, heading, distance from the home point, battery life, signal strength, GPS health, and displays the aircraft geographic location, home point and tablet location on a map background, including an indicator of the direct path back to home point. Telemetry information is also available overlaid on the camera view option. The flight control software includes automatic return to home in case of a lost link or low battery. Auto-land is activated at critically low battery to avoid a loss of control.

Pilot/Personnel Details:

The applicant is the sole RPIC requested under the terms of this waiver. Applicant is a current certificated flight instructor – instrument, airplane single engine land. Applicant’s knowledge of meteorological factors, and the operations of aircraft in reduced visibility is to the standards required under 14 CFR Part 61 for a certificated flight instructor – instrument. Applicant will maintain currency in accordance with Part 61 to meet the terms of this request.

Operations conducted under this waiver will include a minimum of one visual observer (VO) to aid in maintaining clearance from obstacles, non-participating persons, and air traffic. VO(s) will be responsible to scan the operations area for other aircraft, vehicles
and people on the ground. VO(s) will maintain immediate communication with the RPIC through verbal or two-way full duplex, hands free radio contact to inform of any encroachment of the operations area. The VO(s) will hold an FAA Part 107 certificate and at a minimum will hold a FAA private pilot certificate or higher.

The training involved in the above qualifications includes material on aircraft operations in instrument conditions and meteorological factors. VOs will maintain required currency in their qualification, or will attend yearly refresher with the Responsible Person (CFI) on the subjects listed above. The RPIC will ensure documentation of this training is obtained and available upon request. The above requirements and further details on required training will be in our Flight Operations and Training Manuals.

§ 107.51(d) Operating Limitations for Small Unmanned Aircraft: Cloud Clearance — Guiding Questions

How will the Remote PIC see and avoid other aircraft that may be flying in the clouds, or be hidden from view because of the clouds?

Flights will not exceed 500 feet from the RPIC and 100 feet AGL, allowing the RPIC and VO to maintain of visual line of sight. This flight distance will be included in our Flight Operations Manual as a prescribed maximum for flights conducted under the provisions of this waiver, which will aid the RPIC or VO in having sufficient time to see and avoid in the unlikely event another aircraft is operating at such low altitudes under cloudy conditions. The sUAS is operated at very low speeds, and similar to the provisions for helicopters in 14 CFR 91.155(b)(1), the slow speed and ability to hover affords the RPIC time to avoid obstacles or other traffic.

Additionally, the VO will be positioned such that his view of the operational area is at an angle to that of the RPIC, better enabling sighting of other aircraft that may come into proximity of the sUAS or enter clouds nearby. However, the applicant does understand that operations such as helicopters, agricultural application, or other unmanned aircraft may be operating in such conditions. The RPIC and VO will also maintain a listening watch for the sounds of low flying aircraft. The RPIC will return the sUAS to home, or immediately descend to 50 feet agl or below tree line if another aircraft is seen or heard anywhere in the vicinity.

The RPIC will maneuver the sUA in accordance with traffic avoidance techniques contained in FAA Advisory Circular 90-48D and the Aeronautical Information Manual Section 8-1-8. The sUA has the ability to stop and hover (the RPIC always has the ability to take over control during an RTH), thereby greatly reducing the complexity of the conflict geometry. In a worst-case scenario, the RPIC can force an emergency landing on the spot, sacrificing the sUA if required.

In order to avoid potential conflict with instrument flight rules aircraft, operations under this request will be limited to no higher than 100 feet AGL.

In the case that unauthorized persons or vehicles are located, the RPIC will adjust flight to avoid them and move toward the home point or pre-determined contingency safe points if able.

How will the remote PIC know when the aircraft is flying too close to the clouds and prevent accidental flight into the clouds?

The sUAS is operated at very low speeds, and similar to the provisions for helicopters in 14 CFR 91.155(b)(1), the slow speed and ability to hover affords the RPIC time to more easily judge lateral closing distance and proximity to cloud. The positioning of the VO at an angle to the RPIC will also assist in maintaining lateral cloud clearance requirements. The use of ground reference landmarks will aid the pilot in judging lateral proximity to areas of cloud.

Cloud bases can be determined by comparing with the heights of prominent ground objects surrounding the operational area, and can be measured using smart-device applications that can measure angles, distance, and elevations such as XXXXXX or XXXXXXXX.

What is maximum vertical distance the aircraft will be visible to the Remote Pilot in Command (Remote PIC), Visual Observer(s), and other aircraft? How was that visibility determined?

Past experience with the sUAS finds that the aircraft operated by the applicant are comfortably visible against a variety of backgrounds up to 1/3 mile (1760 feet) in any direction. As noted above, under the terms of this request, the flight operations manual will require a mission plan of no more than 500 feet from the RPIC, as well as the existing limitation of no more than 100 feet agl.

When using automated waypoint flight, the mission can be programmed for specific altitudes, which will aid the RPIC in determining the location and orientation of the aircraft as well as the proximity of the aircraft to clouds.

To increase conspicuity, whenever operations are conducted in conditions in proximity to clouds, the sUAS will operate additional lighting visible from at least 3sm in daylight conditions. A minimum of 2 commercially available LED lights, with manufacturer specifications for at least 3sm visibility, (consistent with the minimum candela rating per the US Coast Guard standard for anchor lights Title 33 Part 84.14), will be mounted on the aircraft to ensure visibility by the RPIC, VO, and other aircraft. Reflective tape will be attached to any sUAS operated under the terms of this waiver and placed so as to be visible from any orientation. The reflective tape colors will be high contrast to the sUAS aircraft color, i.e. bright red or blue on a white sUAS, bright yellow or silver on a dark colored sUAS, or both.

In the case one person has lost sight, the others will use immediate communication to aid the person who has lost sight, utilizing clear directional commands using compass directions. In the case the RPIC has lost sight and cannot quickly regain visual contact, the automated return-to-home function will be activated. In the event of communication failure between RPIC and VO(s) the RPIC will immediately return the aircraft to home and land. Return to home would not be initiated by the RPIC if, in the opinion of the RPIC, the path and altitude from the last known location would interfere with other aircraft and/or would cause the aircraft to operate over people. The RPIC could alternatively force an emergency landing on the spot, sacrificing the sUA if the RTH path is deemed unsafe.